Calendar Girls June Wrap-Up

So June is almost over. Can it not be? June is like, the best. We’ve had a great month celebrating Pride! It’s been a real joy talking to you all about representation and why it matters. ❤

Pride: Favorite Book with LGBTQ+ Representation

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet – Katie (that’s me!) @ Never Not Reading
Chasing Nirvana – Adrienne @ Darque Dreamer Reads
The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue – Deanna@ Deanna Writes About
The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue – Flavia @ Flavia the Bibliophile
The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo – Samantha @ Modern Witch’s Bookshelf
Women – Lucinda @ Lucinda is Reading
History is All You Left Me – Ashley @ Inside My Minds
Stop! – Sophie @ Beware of the Reader
Seven Blades in Black – Dani @ Mousai Books
Girls of Paper and Fire – Clarissa @ Clarissa Reads it All

Our Favorite Pick Is…

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Sorting Hat Sunday: Brooklynn 99

“Hey Gina,” Jake said, looking nervously over his shoulder, “what’s the sorting?”

“Dude, Jake, you just gotta stop worrying about it, man. You’re cramping my style.”

“Gina, we all look exactly the same.”

“No, you all look exactly the same. I am a goddess.”

“Yeah, you’re right.” Jake looked around again. Everyone else seemed so confident, and he … wasn’t. Maybe it was time to make another joke. “Do you think we’re going to have to fight a troll or something?” A girl standing behind him giggled.

“Jake, don’t be rediculous,” Gina said, “it’s not going to be a troll. It’s going to be way scarier, like a dragon or something.”

“WHAT? A DRAGON? Gina, we have to get out of here,” he whispered, panicking a little.

“Good evening students,” a tall, black teacher said in a shocking monotone as he walked through the door. “I am Professor Raymond Holt, and I will be your defense against the dark arts teacher this year.”

“You want us to call you Professor Raymond Holt?” Jake asked. The girl behind him giggled again.

Holt turned and stared at him. “Don’t you think that if I wanted you to address me as Professor Raymond Holt I would have instructed you to call me Professor Raymond Holt?”

Jake gulped. What does that even mean?

“Now, if no one else would like to make any other ridiculous attempts at humor, you may follow me into the Great Hall for the sorting.”

Jake Peralta

Jake is a classic goof-ball who is surprisingly competent and dedicated to doing the right thing. He’s like Fred and George. To me he is characterized by his loyalty to the 99 and to his captain. He always does the right thing, even when it sucks, and is brave enough to go under cover, turn in dirty cops, and wait it out in prison.

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Review: Star-Crossed

Star-Crossed by Minnie Darke

Genre: Chick-Lit
Maturity Level: 5
View on Goodreads
Rating: ⋆⋆⋆⋆

When childhood sweethearts Justine (Sagittarius and serious skeptic) and Nick (Aquarius and true believer) bump into each other as adults, a life-changing love affair seems inevitable. To Justine, anyway. Especially when she learns Nick is an astrological devotee, whose decisions are guided by the stars, and more specifically, by the horoscopes in his favorite magazine. The same magazine Justine happens to write for. As Nick continues to not fall headlong in love with her, Justine decides to take Nick’s horoscope, and Fate itself, into her own hands. But, of course, Nick is not the only Aquarius making important life choices according to what is written in the stars. 

Charting the ripple effects of Justine’s astrological meddling, STAR-CROSSED is a delicious, intelligent, and affecting love story about friendship, chance, and how we all navigate the kinds of choices that are hard to face alone.


Here it is! Finally! THE ROMANTIC COMEDY I’VE BEEN SEARCHING FOR!!!

Reading Star-Crossed was exactly like watching a classic RomCom. It was sweet, and funny, and had just the right amount of mischief.

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Maybe I Should be Reading with Cliff’s Notes…

So there I am, reading a classic like Bless Me, Ultima or something. And I’m reading it, and it’s gorgeous, and I can tell that it’s amazing, and I can tell that the author is trying to tell me SOMETHING, but I just. can’t. figure. it out.

I can’t be the only person this happens to, right?

I don’t know what it is about 20th century literature, but I always feel like I’m missing something. I know enough about literature to be able to tell that something is going on, but not enough to tell what it is. Maybe it’s that the literary elements they teach us in school like metaphor and symbolism are more relevant to Romantic literature than Modern and Postmodern. Maybe it’s just that I don’t really know all that much about literature, and I can’t figure it out without a teacher holding my hand.

I really want to like these books. I feel like I almost like them. I just don’t understand them well enough.

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Review: Circe

Circe by Madeline Miller

Genres: Fantasy, Historical Fiction (mythology)
Maturity Level: 4
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Rating: ⋆⋆⋆⋆

In the house of Helios, god of the sun and mightiest of the Titans, a daughter is born. But Circe is a strange child—not powerful, like her father, nor viciously alluring like her mother. Turning to the world of mortals for companionship, she discovers that she does possess power—the power of witchcraft, which can transform rivals into monsters and menace the gods themselves.

Threatened, Zeus banishes her to a deserted island, where she hones her occult craft, tames wild beasts and crosses paths with many of the most famous figures in all of mythology, including the Minotaur, Daedalus and his doomed son Icarus, the murderous Medea, and, of course, wily Odysseus.

But there is danger, too, for a woman who stands alone, and Circe unwittingly draws the wrath of both men and gods, ultimately finding herself pitted against one of the most terrifying and vengeful of the Olympians. To protect what she loves most, Circe must summon all her strength and choose, once and for all, whether she belongs with the gods she is born from, or the mortals she has come to love.


I put off even adding Circe to my tbr for a really long time because I figured it had to be over-hyped. I mean, Song of Achilles was fine, but it wasn’t that great, and people were talking about this book like it’s the book of the decade or something. I figured it was all just feminism-hype. But y’all. I am here to tell you, this book is everything is was made out to be.

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Top 10 Books I Want to Re-Read

An inadvertent theme here on Never Not Reading this summer has been re-reading. I have been consistently lamenting that I don’t re-read books anymore, and I’ve found out that I’m not alone! Apparently a lot of book bloggers prioritize reading new things over re-reading for the sake of creating content for their blogs, but wish they could find the time to re-read.

So today I bring you the books that not re-reading is breaking my heart.

10. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

I read this book my senior year of high school and was so enchanted by it. I want to re-read it partly because it’s been long enough that I can’t remember it very clearly, and I want to get to know it again. But also because I bet that there’s a lot more to this book that I missed. I’m a much better reader than I was thirteen years ago, and I bet I would appreciate it at a much deeper level. I’ve been itching to re-read this one since I saw it on The Great American Read last summer.

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Review: Young Jane Young

Young Jane Young by Gabrielle Zevin

Genres: Women’s Lit; Fiction
Maturity Level: 4
View on Goodreads
Rating: ⋆⋆⋆⋆

“Young Jane Young’s” heroine is Aviva Grossman, an ambitious congressional intern in Florida who makes the life-changing mistake of having an affair with her boss – who is beloved, admired, successful, and very married – and blogging about it. When the affair comes to light, the congressman doesn’t take the fall, but Aviva does, and her life is over before it hardly begins. She becomes a late-night talk show punchline; she is slut shamed and considered a blight on politics in general. How does one go on after this?

In Aviva’s case, she sees no way out but to change her name and move to a remote town in Maine. She tries to start over as a wedding planner, to be smarter about her life, and to raise her daughter to be strong and confident. But when, at the urging of others, she decides to run for public office herself, that long ago mistake trails her via the Internet like a scarlet A. For in our age, Google guarantees that the past is never, ever truly past, that everything you’ve done will live on for everyone to know about for all eternity. And it’s only a matter of time until Aviva’s daughter, Ruby, finds out who her mother was and is and must decide whether she can still respect her.


I expected to really like this book, but I was surprised by how much fun I had reading it! It’s a captivating story, well-written, a quick read, and a great reading experience.

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