The Beatles Book Tag

My friend and very favorite blogger, The Orangutan Librarian, recently created The Beatles Book Tag. Little known fact, The Beatles are my all-time favorite band, and my favorite song in the whole world and all styles of music is a Beatles song. So I was so excited to get tagged and would have tagged myself if she didn’t. *smiles*

Rules:

  1. Tag back to the original creator Orang-utan Librarian (me)
  2. Thank whoever tagged you
  3. Tag people and keep it going!

Love Me Do

A book with a character you wish would love you

It’s pretty hard to go wrong with The Orangutan Librarian’s original answer, Mr. Knightly. I would also be okay if Faramir came knocking on my door.

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Unforgettable Bookish Memories Tag

I was tagged in this a bajillion years ago by The Orangutan Librarian. If you have somehow never been over there, go today. She’s the BEST. Seriously.

No. 1: The First Book You Ever Read (or was read to you)

51hXWiuxGYLGood grief, I don’t know. Probably something by Sandra Boynton. Ever since my son was born my mom has been obsessing about Moo Baa LaLaLa, so I guess she read that to me? Continue reading “Unforgettable Bookish Memories Tag”

Review: Bringing Up Bébé

11910983Bringing Up Bébé by Pamela Druckerman

Genres: Parenting, Memoir, Non-fiction
Maturity Level: 4
View on Goodreads
Rating: ⋆⋆⋆⋆


The secret behind France’s astonishingly well-behaved children. When American journalist Pamela Druckerman has a baby in Paris, she doesn’t aspire to become a “French parent.” French parenting isn’t a known thing, like French fashion or French cheese. Even French parents themselves insist they aren’t doing anything special.

Yet, the French children Druckerman knows sleep through the night at two or three months old while those of her American friends take a year or more. French kids eat well-rounded meals that are more likely to include braised leeks than chicken nuggets. And while her American friends spend their visits resolving spats between their kids, her French friends sip coffee while the kids play.

With a notebook stashed in her diaper bag, Druckerman-a former reporter for The Wall Street Journal-sets out to learn the secrets to raising a society of good little sleepers, gourmet eaters, and reasonably relaxed parents. She discovers that French parents are extremely strict about some things and strikingly permissive about others. And she realizes that to be a different kind of parent, you don’t just need a different parenting philosophy. You need a very different view of what a child actually is.

While finding her own firm non, Druckerman discovers that children-including her own-are capable of feats she’d never imagined.


Bringing Up Bébé is not a step-by-step parenting “how to”. It’s not even really a parenting book in the way you would expect. It’s half memoir, half journalistic cultural exploration of how the French culture views children in a profoundly different way than the American culture.

Continue reading “Review: Bringing Up Bébé”