Review: Same Kind of Different as Me

Same Kind of Different as Me by Ron Hall, Denver Moore, and Lynn Vincent

Genres: Memoir, Christianity
Maturity Level: 3 (content warning: n-word, cancer)
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Rating:
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It begins outside a burning plantation hut in Louisiana . . . and an East Texas honky-tonk . . . and, without a doubt, inside the heart of God. It unfolds at a Hollywood hacienda . . . an upscale New York gallery . . . a downtown dumpster . . . a Texas ranch.

Gritty with betrayal, pain, and brutality, it also shines with an unexpected, life-changing love.


Ron Hall was (is?) a millionaire art dealer in the Dallas/Fort Worth area of Texas. When he began volunteering at a local homeless shelter he met and eventually became friends with Denver Moore, who had been homeless some thirty years after spending time in prison. They changed each other’s lives, and remain best friends.

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Review: A Year of Biblical Womanhood

13544022A Year of Biblical Womanhood by Rachel Held Evans

Genres: Memoir, Christianity, Nonfiction
Maturity Level: 2
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Rating: ⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆


Strong-willed and independent, Rachel Held Evans couldn’t sew a button on a blouse before she embarked on a radical life experiment–a year of biblical womanhood. Intrigued by the traditionalist resurgence that led many of her friends to abandon their careers to assume traditional gender roles in the home, Evans decides to try it for herself, vowing to take all of the Bible’s instructions for women as literally as possible for a year.

Pursuing a different virtue each month, Evans learns the hard way that her quest for biblical womanhood requires more than a “gentle and quiet spirit” (1 Peter 3:4). It means growing out her hair, making her own clothes, covering her head, obeying her husband, rising before dawn, abstaining from gossip, remaining silent in church, and even camping out in the front yard during her period.

See what happens when a thoroughly modern woman starts referring to her husband as “master” and “praises him at the city gate” with a homemade sign. Learn the insights she receives from an ongoing correspondence with an Orthodox Jewish woman, and find out what she discovers from her exchanges with a polygamist wife. Join her as she wrestles with difficult passages of scripture that portray misogyny and violence against women. 


Part memoir, part Biblical study, A Year of Biblical Womanhood was funny, informative, touching, and thoughtful. Continue reading “Review: A Year of Biblical Womanhood”