Soul Ripping Romance Tag

Way back around Valentines Day The Orangutan Librarian tagged me in this very simple yet obviously-I-have-to-do-it tag. If you aren’t following The Orangutan Librarian yet, you are seriously missing out and you need to go fix it NOW. That being said, you are probably going to see a lot of the same things in this tag, because we are too much alike considering we are, in fact, not even from the same species.


The Rules

  • Thank the person who tagged you and create a pingback to the original author – Nel at Reactionary Tales.
  • Share at least 5 (but more are welcome) romances that tugged your heart strings. They can be from books, movies, TV shows, manga; anything you can think of! They can be examples of sad tears, angry tears, happy tears or a combination of all three.
  • Nominate 5 (or more) people to share their emotional traumas
  • (Note: Try not to spoil the story for your readers in case they would like to check out these romances on their own)

My Favorite Romances

Ron and Hermione

My OTP. Forever. I will fight you to the death on this one, especially if you’re going to try tell me that Hermione aught to have ended up with Harry. Or if you are going to tell me that Harry Potter is horrible.

Continue reading “Soul Ripping Romance Tag”

Calendar Girls March: Favorite Book with a Strong Female Lead

Welcome to March Calendar Girls! I’m feeling good today. Spring is here, I’m bound to not be sick anymore soon, and the future is looking up! I’m ready to talk about books. Who else is ready to talk about books?

Our theme for this month is Women’s History Month: books featuring a strong female lead. I had to think for a bit about this one. What is a strong female lead?

Typically when we talk about the strong female lead we’re talking about the warrior women. And, of course, the first book that came to mind was my all-time favorite, The Lord of the Rings. Eowyn has long been one of my favorite characters in literature because she rides to war with the men, but does so for love rather than glory. I was very much looking forward to talking about her for a few hundred words until I realized she’s not the lead. *sigh*

Which got me to thinking about my other favorite book: Pride and Prejudice. Because, is Elizabeth Bennett not also a strong character? Strength doesn’t only have to refer to strength in arms. Elizabeth thinks for herself, knows what she wants, and doesn’t let the men in her life tell her what to do. To me that is the definition of a strong female lead!

And yet, there’s also the anti-strong-female-lead idea, which proposes that those characters are just proof of how we prefer men by putting traditionally masculine qualities on to women before we can get behind them. Perhaps a woman like Mrs. Weasley who does what makes her happy and doesn’t worry about what she “should” want or do would be the most appropriate kind of woman to celebrate this month.

As you can see, I am waaaaay overthinking this prompt.

So right now I am stopping and going with my gut. My favorite (or at least a favorite) book featuring a strong female lead is…

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Jane Eyre
by Charlotte Bronte

Okay, so I admit that this pick is … unusual. But what I love about Jane Eyre is that she is strong. She takes control of her own life, despite the multitude of people who are trying to set her path for her. She doesn’t let society’s expectations dictate who she is or who she will be. She has the sort of strength of character to say no to something she really wants when she knows it is the right thing to do. Jane is a woman that I have looked up to for my entire adult life.

For those of you who don’t know, Jane Eyre is the story of an orphan raised in terrible, abusive situations, who rises to become a governess in a wealthy home. She falls in love with the master of the house, but there is more to Mr. Rochester than meets the eye. It’s moody, mysterious, brooding, and the original feminist novel. (my opinion)

While I’ve seen modern feminists critique Jane Eyre, at the time it was written it was like nothing literature had ever seen before. Even now, nearly two hundred years later, it remains one of the most celebrated works of literature in history. And it was written by a WOMAN. Y’all, that’s pretty amazing.

Women’s History Month
Favorite Book with a Strong Female Lead

Our Picks

Jane Eyre – Katie (that’s me!) @ Never Not Reading
The Poet X – Adrienne @ Darque Dreamer Reads
To Best the Boys – Teri Polen
Dread Nation – Deanna @ Deanna Writes About
A Court of Mist and Fury – Flavia @ Flavia the Bibliophile
Skyward – Lucinda @ Lucinda is Reading
Harry Potter – Samantha @ Modern Witch’s Bookshelf
A Curse So Dark and Lonely – Sophie @ Beware of the Reader
The Last Letter – Sophie @ Beware of the Reader
Kat and Meg Conquer the World – Dani @ Mousai Books
I Am Malala – Ashely @ Inside My Minds
An Ember in the Ashes – Liz @ Stellar Kitten Book Reivews


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Calendar Girls is a monthly blog event created by Melanie at MNBernard Books, and Flavia at Flavia the Bibliophile, and is now be hosted by me (!), Katie, and Adrienne at Darque Dreamer Reads. It is designed to ignite bookish discussions among readers, and was inspired by the 1961 Neil Sedaka song, Calendar Girl.

Just like the song, each month has a different theme. Each blogger picks their favorite book from the theme, and on the first Monday of the month reveals their pick in a Calendar Girls post. Make sure to post back to the hostess’s post, and I will make a master list for the month. The master lists allow everyone to see the other Calendar Girls’ picks and to pop on over to their blogs. Thus, we all get to chat about books and even make some new friends!

Sign up for the Calendar Girls newsletter.

Review: My Plain Jane

My Plain Jane by Cynthia Hand, Jodi Meadows, and Brodi Ashton

36301023Series: The Lady Janies
Genres: Young Adult, Historical Fiction, Fantasy
Maturity Level: 3
View on Goodreads
Rating: ⋆⋆


You may think you know the story. After a miserable childhood, penniless orphan Jane Eyre embarks on a new life as a governess at Thornfield Hall. There, she meets one dark, brooding Mr. Rochester. Despite their significant age gap (!) and his uneven temper (!!), they fall in love—and, Reader, she marries him. (!!!)

Or does she?

Prepare for an adventure of Gothic proportions, in which all is not as it seems, a certain gentleman is hiding more than skeletons in his closets, and one orphan Jane Eyre, aspiring author Charlotte Brontë, and supernatural investigator Alexander Blackwood are about to be drawn together on the most epic ghost hunt this side of Wuthering Heights.


Everyone said that My Plain Jane wasn’t as good as My Lady Jane, but I ignored them because I figured it was just a preference thing. But Reader, I am here to tell you that they were right. They were so, so right. Continue reading “Review: My Plain Jane”

Top 5 Most Romantic Moments in a Book

Most romantic moments

Happy Valentines Day bookworms!

In celebration of world date-night, I thought it might be fun to go through some of my favorite romantic moments in literature, especially since they’re probably pretty different from most people’s! I am a hopeless romantic, but what makes my heart flutter in a book is pretty unique.

These are in no particular order.

1. Jane Eyre

“‘Good Night, my ——–.’ He stopped, bit his lip, and abruptly left me.”

The first time I ever read Jane Eyre I swear my heart stopped right here. I dog eared it, something I never do, and at this point the crease is so deep I’m afraid it may fall off.

This right here is the moment that the reader realizes that Mr. Rochester cares as deeply for Jane as she does for him. He nearly calls her “my dear” or “my love” or something equally sweet and adorable, catches himself, and runs away in embarrassment. *swoon* Best end of a chapter ever. Continue reading “Top 5 Most Romantic Moments in a Book”

Top 5 Literary Man Crushes

It’s Man Crush Monday!

Okay, first of all, this was hard for me. I am a married woman and I’ve been with my husband since I was 18, so it has been a long time since I thought about other men romantically! I love my husband, and I wouldn’t trade him for anyone. No, not even for Mr. Darcy. So I had to think back a ways. Prepare to see a lot of the classics.

1. Fitzwilliam Darcy
Untitled
I know, I know, it’s cliche. But there’s a reason everyone loves Mr. Darcy. He’s charming, he’s got the strong silent type thing going, and we all identify as Elizabeth Bennett. However, I think the reason we really love Mr. Darcy is that, deep down, we honestly believe we can change our man. If there’s something we don’t like about him we think: “If I stick with him, I can fix him. Then everything will be amazing.” Even when it’s not true, we cling to that belief. But Mr. Darcy does change. When Elizabeth points out what an arrogant jerk he is, he looks down deep and recognizes his own shortcomings. Then he goes and changes them, becoming a better person and winning her love. And THAT is why we love him. Continue reading “Top 5 Literary Man Crushes”